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Etiology of malocclusion and dominant orthodontic problems in mixed dentition: A cross-sectional study in a group of Thai children aged 8–9 years


1 Orthodontic Section, Department of Preventive Dentistry, Prince of Songkla University, Songkhla, Thailand
2 Improvement of Oral Health Care Research Unit, Community Dentistry Section, Department of Preventive Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, Prince of Songkla University, Songkhla, Thailand

Correspondence Address:
Supanee Suntornlohanakul,
Orthodontic Section, Department of Preventive Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Songkhla 90112
Thailand
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None

DOI: 10.4103/jispcd.JISPCD_120_19

Background: Etiology of malocclusion can be the cause of deviation in the skeleton, dental, and soft tissue development in children. Identifying etiology of malocclusion and dominant orthodontic problems as well as early detection could help in future effective treatment, management, and public health planning. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was performed among 202 children. Consensus process was carried out between experienced orthodontic experts in etiology of malocclusion, dominant orthodontic problems, type of early treatment, and malocclusion severity. Fisher’s exact test and descriptive statistics were used to explain the study results. Results: Etiology of malocclusion was detected in both congenital and acquired etiology (64.3%), followed by acquired etiology only (29.7%). The top three dominant orthodontic problems were caries (22.5%), early loss of primary tooth (15.6%), and tendency of crowding in permanent dentition (14.6%). Nearly all the children needed restoration (86.4%) and interceptive orthodontic treatment (69.3%), whereas severe malocclusion level was found in one-fourth of the children (26.0%). Statistical significance was found between type of early treatment and malocclusion severity (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Acquired etiology was very high. Caries and early loss of primary teeth were dominant orthodontic problems. An early treatment, especially preventive orthodontic treatment, was needed in almost all children. Malocclusion severity higher than moderate level was found in more than half of the children.


    
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    -  Rapeepattana S
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