Journal of International Society of Preventive and Community Dentistry

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2017  |  Volume : 7  |  Issue : 9  |  Page : 137--142

Self-reported knowledge, attitude and consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages among undergraduate oral health students at a university in South Africa


Thomas K Madiba, Ahmed Bhayat, Ntombizodwa R Nkambule 
 Department of Community Dentistry, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa

Correspondence Address:
Ahmed Bhayat
Department of Community Dentistry, University of Pretoria, Pretoria
South Africa

Aims and Objectives: This study assessed the knowledge, attitude and consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) and its association with body mass index (BMI) among undergraduate oral health students. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional design was used and the study was conducted at a South African dental university. Undergraduate dental and oral hygiene students (n = 344) registered in 2015 were invited to participate. A self-administered questionnaire was used to elicit the necessary information. Data analysis included frequencies and correlations using Chi-square tests. Statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. Results: The response rate was 88% (301) and the mean age was 22.3 years (range: 17–42; standard deviation ±3.2). The majority were female (72%) and 70% of respondents had an acceptable level of knowledge on the types of SSBs and possible health conditions if consumed excessively. Almost half (46%) had a positive attitude toward the consumption of SSBs. Clinical students had a significantly higher level of knowledge compared to nonclinical students (P = 0.03). Participants consumed an average of six teaspoons (±9.5) of sugar from SSBs daily. Those with poor knowledge and attitude consumed significantly more SSBs (P < 0.01) than those with higher levels of knowledge and attitude. Males were significantly more obese and overweight than females (P < 0.01). There was no association between the amount of sugar consumed from SSBs and the BMI. Conclusions: The knowledge and attitude toward SSBs was acceptable. Although sugar consumption from SSBs was relatively high, there was no significant correlation between the consumption of SSBs and the BMI.


How to cite this article:
Madiba TK, Bhayat A, Nkambule NR. Self-reported knowledge, attitude and consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages among undergraduate oral health students at a university in South Africa.J Int Soc Prevent Communit Dent 2017;7:137-142


How to cite this URL:
Madiba TK, Bhayat A, Nkambule NR. Self-reported knowledge, attitude and consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages among undergraduate oral health students at a university in South Africa. J Int Soc Prevent Communit Dent [serial online] 2017 [cited 2019 Oct 19 ];7:137-142
Available from: http://www.jispcd.org/article.asp?issn=2231-0762;year=2017;volume=7;issue=9;spage=137;epage=142;aulast=Madiba;type=0