Journal of International Society of Preventive and Community Dentistry

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2020  |  Volume : 10  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 394--401

Sugary snack consumption and tooth retention among middle-aged Thai adults


Supawadee Naorungroj 
 Department of Conservative Dentistry, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Thailand; Common Oral Diseases and Oral Epidemiology Research Center, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Thailand; Prosthodontics and Occlusion Rehabilitation Research Unit, Faculty of Dentistry, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Thailand

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Supawadee Naorungroj
Department of Conservative Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Songkhla.
Thailand

Objectives: This study investigated whether the habit of consuming sugary snacks was independently associated with the loss of permanent teeth. Materials and Methods: Eight hundred ninety-seven adults aged 35–65 from four communities in the lower regions of Southern Thailand completed a structured questionnaire interview and dental examinations. The independent variable was frequency of sweet snack consumption between meals in the previous week and coded as: never (0 days), occasionally (1–4 days), or frequently (≥5 days). The outcome was the number of permanent teeth (1–19 vs. ≥20 teeth). Multivariate logistic regression was used to examine the adjusted associations between sugary snack consumption and the number of retained teeth. Odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. Results: Approximately 23% of participants retained fewer than 20 permanent teeth. Approximately 30% of participants reported sugary snack intake most days. Fewer teeth were positively associated with high-frequency sugary snack consumption, older age, Muslim, ≤ 6 years of education, universal healthcare, infrequent tooth brushing, smoking, and alcohol consumption, but not sugar-sweetened beverages. After adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics and other potential confounders, the odds of having fewer teeth were higher among participants who frequently consumed sugary snacks (OR = 2.03, 95% CI = 1.21–3.39), but was not significantly different from those who occasionally consumed sugary snacks (OR = 0.93; 95% CI = 0.58–1.50) compared to nonsugary snack consumers. Conclusion: In this study, habitual sugary snack intake was associated with fewer teeth among middle-aged Thai adults. To improve oral health and prevent further tooth loss, efforts to reduce sugary snack consumption would be needed.


How to cite this article:
Naorungroj S. Sugary snack consumption and tooth retention among middle-aged Thai adults.J Int Soc Prevent Communit Dent 2020;10:394-401


How to cite this URL:
Naorungroj S. Sugary snack consumption and tooth retention among middle-aged Thai adults. J Int Soc Prevent Communit Dent [serial online] 2020 [cited 2020 Sep 22 ];10:394-401
Available from: http://www.jispcd.org/article.asp?issn=2231-0762;year=2020;volume=10;issue=4;spage=394;epage=401;aulast=Naorungroj;type=0