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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 11  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 324-331

The impact of pregnancy and menopause on the correlation between salivary calcium levels, calcium intake, and bleeding on probing (BOP)


1 Department of Oral Biology, Faculty of Dentistry, Padjadjaran University, Bandung, Indonesia
2 School of Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, Padjadjaran University, Bandung, Indonesia
3 Department of Prosthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, Padjadjaran University, Bandung, Indonesia

Correspondence Address:
Dr Sri Tjahajawati
Department of Oral Biology, Faculty of Dentistry, Padjadjaran University, Jl. Raya Bandung Sumedang KM.21, Hegarmanah, Kec. Jatinangor, Kabupaten Sumedang, Jawa Barat., 45363
Indonesia
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jispcd.JISPCD_14_21

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Aims: Evaluate the impact of pregnancy and menopause on the correlation between salivary calcium levels, calcium intake, and bleeding on probing (BOP), so it can be used as indicators to determine the oral health status of pregnant and menopausal women. Materials and Methods: This was a descriptive study using a cross-sectional approach. Participants included 26 menopausal women, 24 pregnant women, and 35 control subjects. Salivary calcium levels were measured using an atomic absorption spectrophotometer, and calcium intake was assessed using a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. Other supporting data included height, weight, blood pressure, blood glucose level, salivary pH, and volume. Results: The mean salivary calcium levels of pregnant women (0.72 ± 0.61 mmol/L) were lower than those of control subjects (1.69 ± 0.81 mmol/L), but the mean salivary calcium levels of menopausal women were higher (1.99 ± 1.24 mmol/L). Most of the subjects in all three groups had inadequate calcium intake. The mean BOP values of pregnant and menopausal women were higher than those of the control subjects. This study found the only variable that correlated with the salivary calcium level was the menopausal group’s blood glucose level (P = 0.009). Conclusions: Pregnancy and menopause did not have an impact on the relationship between salivary calcium levels and BOP but had an impact on the relationship between salivary calcium levels and calcium intake. Calcium intake did not affect salivary calcium levels in both conditions when compared with the control group.


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